Objectify This! Opening

The best thing about going to school in Chicago is that there’s never a lack of things going on around here.  I was pretty giddy when I heard Street Anatomy’s Vanessa Ruiz was curating a show only about one L stop away, and even more ridiculously excited when I saw it featured on Juxtapoz Magazine’s site.  And I was going.  To an event featured on Juxtapoz.  I felt like I had finally entered the art world. Cincinnati’s art scene is great, but this was the major league (atleast as far as my experiences had been).  And the event really didn’t disappoint.

Objectify This! essentially summed up everything I ever tried to do in my BFA senior thesis.  Beautifully painted female nudes, exposing what was under the skin. One of my favorite artists was there: Fernando Vicente (who I had researched during my BFA thesis), plus some of my now other favorites (where have you been all my life?).  There were anatomy-themed burlesque performances and little anatomically correct heart chocolates that oozed red filling.  It seems like the show as made for me.  If I only had my mohawk, I could have died happy.

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Design and Typography Games and Method of Action

Recently, someone posted to Twitter a typography kerning game (kerning = the space between individual letters in a word), and I thought this was fantastic.  Of course I played it, achieved a mediocre score, and bookmarked it, filing it away in deep pit known as my “favorites.”

Just today, a friend of mine Autumn on her blog, posted another typography game about letter shapes.  Two in the same week?  Impossible.  But not if they are made by the same person/group/guardian angel of design.  The two looked a whole lot alike and after some investigation I found they were definitely related.

These games were pre-released games for the new Method of Action, a website with 3 different “courses.”  From their about page:

Method of Action is an educational website that will launch with three different courses: design, entrepreneurship and gardening. Every course is composed by 50 different “missions”. Each mission will accompanied by insightful articles or video that establish best practices for the task at hand, recommending books for further reading, or tools that can help you accomplish your goal.

You can then submit your completed mission, and more experienced peers will review it, giving a passing or failing grade. If you succeed, you will gain points that give you access to more difficult missions.

As you gain experience, you will be able to review and help less experienced users.

Method of Action’s design course “Design for Programmers” is on the cusp of release.  Jackpot.

I am not a programmer or a designer (yet), but I am someone who loves looking at design, and thinks I should be better at graphic design with almost 10 years and two degrees to “train my artistic eye.”  Though I am taking a graphic design course for the first time this semester, I am always looking for things to help me “get” design.

Apparently, their games have been floating around the internet for some time.  Click on the image to play! (Plus the Kerning game up top).

I absolutely can’t wait for the website launch, and you can sign up to be notified by email or follow Method of Action on Twitter.  You can’t learn to do everything, but there isn’t any rule against trying.